Love Triangles. Or, herbed mushroom marsala phyllo yumminess.

Finger food season is coming. Or, maybe I need to think that because I love the buttery flaky crunch of little tidbits wrapped in that miracle dough.

We were at Caravan two weeks ago, so of course I got a couple packages of phyllo for the freezer.
Only when we got home, I threw one in the fridge on a whim, intending to make some spanky. Well, that didn’t happen. Then when I woke up this morning and opened the fridge, there was this package of mushrooms staring at me. Right next to some thyme, and the phyllo. Like they planned it or something.

This came together slowly, with me futzing on the internet and getting up to stir when the timer went off. It’s not a fast recipe, but it doesn’t require a lot of attention, either.
You could totally make the filling for this one day, and then assemble up to a couple days later. I just had a leisurely Saturday morning.

These are SO LOVELY. I am concluding that himself enjoyed them, as I gave him a sample to take a bite and when I turned around the whole thing was gone. I had them with some bubbly, but am thinking now I bet they would be great with some Amontillado. I’m also wondering how that phyllo would do brushed with layers of that fantastic thyme oil from IKEA instead of butter. That would seriously amp up the herbaceous flavor. Hmmm….. anywho. These are yum. Invite some friends over for a bite and a glass, and make these. You will be sooooo very happy you did.

Herbed Mushroom Marsala Phyllo Triangles

2 medium white onions, sliced in ¼” crescents
2 Tbsp butter
Sprinkle salt
8 oz button mushrooms, washed and sliced into ¼” slices
2 tsp fresh thyme
¼ c. good dry sherry or marsala
½ c. chopped toasted walnuts
¼ c. grated parmesan or pecorino romano(even the green can stuff would be fine)
(4 oz. fresh goat cheese. optional)

½ pkg.-ish of #4 phyllo dough
6 Tbsp. melted butter

Caramelize the onions. Melt the 2 Tbsp butter in a saute pan on low, add the onions, sprinkle with salt and cover. Cook on low, stirring every 20 mins or so until they are reduced and golden. Push the onions to the side, add the mushrooms, thyme, and little more salt. Cook covered, on medium, until the mushrooms are cooked. Remove the lid, pour in the marsala and cook a few more minutes until practically all the fluid has evaporated. Remove from the heat. Stir in the nuts. Check for seasoning, add S&P to taste. Set aside to cool. Once it’s coolish, stir in the cheese.

Preheat oven to 375*. Layer three sheets of phyllo, brushing butter between each. If you’ve never worked with phyllo, don’t be escared. See how here!

Using a pizza cutter or knife, slice the prepared sheet of dough into four strips (with the phyllo in a landscape orientation in front of you. So, four short strips, not longways. In the bottom right corner of each one , place about 2 Tbsp. cooled filling, dot with a little noisette of the goat cheese if using, and triangle fold your way up the dough until you have a little triangle packet. See how here!

Roll ‘em all up till you’re out of patience or filling, whichever comes first. . Brush all the tops with the last of the butter. Bake 375* for 15-20 minutes, until golden brown and delicious. Serve warm or room temperature. These are lovely with a buttery icy cold white, or even better, a dry prosecco or sparkling rose like Gruet’s Jacqueline Leonne pink label. Alas, I had a bottle of prosecco open at shooting so we’ll have to wait for a rose pic down the road. But that Leonne is my current fave, and it is from FREAKING ABQ NEW MEXICO.

Enjoy. We sure did.

Pumpkin. And Bread.


Happy October, Betches! It’s pumpkin baking time!

You know I love to roast and purée a big squash for the freezer. This is not any cheaper than buying canned pumpkin, but it makes me happy. So, this year I tried a completely different variety and I think it is THE ONE. I have no idea what this is called – it’s the kind you get at the Mexican supermarket and poach like camotes in piloncillo syrup for the kids. But my Goddess, the color! I wish you could see this in real life – it is the most deep, gorgeous, vivid orange. Almost vermillion.
And once it’s baked? Even deeper with just a tinge of brick red. It’s fantastic – and made the bread this luscious pumpkin-y color. I’m so pleased with this I can’t contain myself. I cannot wait to try making a pumpkin pie. The only down side was the yield – this was a six pound pumpkin. I cooked half and got 4.5 cups of strained purée, but almost six in water. Lawdee lawd but that puppy was loaded with water. But I digress.

Pumpkin bread. For the past few years, every time I make it the color is so pale you can’t even tell there’s any pumpkin in it. Not this year – it’s totes gorgeous.

I found a new recipe to tweak, too. I was intrigued because it uses water and not milk. I used the strained pumpkin water since I had it. And added some whole wheat flour. But this was truly one of the best pumpkin breads I’ve ever made. Himself, the gals at the office, and the folks at Himself’s office all loved it. So, go make this right now. Use canned pumpkin – it will still be freaking delicious.

Ingredients
The Dry
2.5 c. sugar
2.5 c. AP flour
1 c. Whole Wheat flour
2 tsp. baking soda (yes, really)
1.5 tsp. salt
1 Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice

The Wet
2 c. pumpkin purée (or, one 14.5oz can – which is about 2.25 c.)
4 eggs
1 cup vegetable oil
2/3 cup water

The Topping
Melted unsalted butter
Cinnamon sugar

Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour two 8″ x 4″ loaf pans (or line two twelve-unit muffin tins).
In a large bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients.
In a second bowl, whisk together the wet. Then, with a large spoon or spatula fold the wet in to the dry. You want a barely homogenous batter, not activated gluten. Divide into the pans.
Bake for about 55-70 minutes in the preheated oven, until they pass the toothpick test.(I’d start testing the muffins a the half hour mark.)

Once they’ve cooled on the rack about ten minutes, brush them with the melted butter and generously sprinkle them with the cinnamon sugar. After about an hour – they should be blood warm – run the dull side of a butterknife along the edges of the pan and then give it a few whacks to make sure the loaf is loose enough to come out. You can let them cool in the pan overnight if you’re making this in the evening, or on the counter until they are wrappable cool. Don’t wrap before they are completely and totally cool, or the top will become a sticky mess.

I wish we could do dairy, because a schmear of plain cream cheese on these thick luscious slices would have been absolute heaven.

Ok – go make this right now. You’ll be sooo happy.