Mexican Spicy Carrot Pickles

Mexican Spicy Carrot Pickles
(Zanahorias en escabeche)

I love the spicy carrots on the salsa bar when we go for tacos. So much so, a couple years back I asked The Google for some recipes. I found one that was okay at the time, but haven’t made it since.
We’re having a Fiesta Friday potluck at the office this week. (Because although we appreciate the alliteration of a Taco Tuesday, none of us has the time for an office party on a Tuesday.) I made carnitas and wanted some cebollas en escabeche to go along. That got me thinking about those carrots again. YouTube is overflowing with awesome home cooks making their zanahorias. I always wondered why there was a tiny bit of oil in the pickle juice – and now I know. The veg are lightly sauteed before adding the vinegar. Dur. Makes perfect sense.

My searches also garnered the Spanish dish by the same name, and it was interesting to see the differences – thyme and pimenton, cook the carrots a little longer. No hot peppers. I’m thinking the Mexican version is a post-colonial smoosh – but, hey. I am no food anthropologist. Anywho, this was maybe twenty minutes start to finish. I bet you have the ingredients already. These stay good a couple weeks in the fridge – if they last that long. Make some today to have ready for your Taco Tuesday. You can totally eat these the same day, but they certainly get better the longer they soak in that gorgeous escabeche.

Zanahorias en escabeche
Makes about 3 cups.
1# carrots, peeled and sliced in to ¼” thick diagonal ovals.
3 jalapenos, halved
½ large white onion, sliced in ¼” thick half-moons
3 cloves garlic, slightly smooshed with the flat of your knife
½ tsp. black pepper corns
2 bay leaves
1 tsp. Mexican oregano leaves
2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
1 ½ c. white vinegar
1 ½ c. water
(sal al gusto)

In a large non-reactive skillet on medium, heat the oil, pepppercorns, bay, oregano, and the garlic until you can smell the garlic. Then, add everything but the water and the vinegar. Stir around (you do not want this to brown) for a minute or two until you see the onions are starting to soften. Pour in the water and vinegar, and simmer until the jalapenos are done – they will change from a deep green to an olive green.
While that is simmering, prepare your container. You want something that can handle hot liquid – I used glass with those snappy silicone gasket lids. Just be sure to heat up the container with some hot water before you dump in your pickles. (Just imagine cold glass and hot liquid. Yeah.)
When the jalapenos are done, scoop all the veg in to your prepared container. Then, pour in just enough of the liquid to cover them. You will most likely have extra liquid at the end. Toss it. Or use it to make a vinaigrette.

That’s it. You’re done. Cool it. Label it & pop it in the fridge and enjoy.
PS – all the recipes I saw added salt to these puppies, but I think this is plenty flavorful without. But add some if you like!

Oh, and if you’re wondering about the red onion and the chile de arbol in the knolled pic – I made some cebollas en escabeche at the same time. But those are already a blog post…

Socca Version 2.0

Ok, so this all started because I checked out the America’s Test Kitchen Mediterranean cookbook. (BTW stop what you’re doing and just go order that right now. I’ll wait. You’re welcome.) Of the gazillion-odd recipes I want to try, it made me want to give socca another go.
I found different-sounding recipes from my first attempt – ones that involved pre-heating a cast iron pan or griddle in a 500* oven, and resting the batter for hours before cooking. First I tried one that called for a 2:1 ratio of water to chick pea flour, and a griddle.

Yeah – that did not go so well. By the third attempt, I was able to get a reasonable crepe out of the pan and munch it with a lovely arugula dressed with meyer lemon juice and olive oil.

The next day, I went back to my second-favorite food boyfriend Bittman and gave that version a shot – it had a 1:1 ratio. I let the batter sit for 12 hours, and used the skillet this time instead of the griddle. Also, I used a shit ton of olive oil in the pan because I had bad sticking problems – but was under the impression my cast iron was reasonably seasoned. Anywho, it turned out.

It was really quite yummy when doused with fresh black pepper. I still don’t know if I’ll make this again – I am hunting something for a good flatbread or pizza base….and the hunt continues.

But this would be an awesome addition to an antipasto or mezze. Give it a whirl!
Socca – based on Bittman’s NYT recipe.
In the morning, whisk together until smooth:
1 c. chickpea flour
1 c. water
Add in:
1/8 c. olive oil
1 tsp. garlic salt
1 tsp. minced fresh rosemary
Cover and let sit for the day (8 hours+)
Half an hour before you want your socca, preheat your oven to 500* and put a 10” cast iron skillet in there to get hot.
You last ingredients are:
1/8 c. olive oil
thinly sliced sweet onion
sliced olives if you’d like
When the oven is at temperature, remove the pan. Pour in about another 1/8 c. olive oil, swirl it and then drop in the onion. They will sizzle. Pour over the batter and stick it back in the oven for about 12-15 minutes.
When it is done, the top will be dry and crackly and feel firm to the touch. Loosen the bottom of the socca and slide it on to a cutting board. Liberally grind on some black pepper, and maybe a drizzle of olive oil. Take the board to the table and munch.

Breakfast Pizza

Oh, food trends. You hipster fuck bastards. It’s as though my world has been enveloped in Breakfast Pizza. It’s in my Instagram feed, my Pinterest feed, peeps at the office are bringing it in from QT. Oy. Fine. FINE. We’ll give this mofo a try.

Twenty googled recipes later, I found a good poolish pizza dough recipe and prepped that before I went to bed.

Then, this morning when I got up, I finished the dough and waited the requisite hour by making coffee, slicing some veg, and catching up on social media.

This was easy, and cooked relatively fast (well, in a 500* oven, anything would, right?). Himself liked it, although after his first bite the first words out of his mouth were, “don’t make this often.” This translates to way-too-yummy-bread-is-not-good-for-him, btw.

I topped mine with what was on hand – some olive oil, parmesan, onions, tomatoes and artichoke hearts plus the eggs, of course. Then a drizzle of pesto on the plate. I was confounded by the variety of cook times for the eggs in my googling. They varied from 8 minutes to 15. That’s a bit much. So I started at 8 and went up from there. I made one thick crust and one thin. I preferred the thick crust, and Himself preferred the thin. Dat ist normal in our house.

Observational notes – final cook time in a 500* convection oven was 12 minutes. The eggs were cold from the fridge. The ones on the thin crust were perfectly medium, the ones on the thick crust were just past sunny side up for the whites, and medium for the yolks. (What the hell, thermodynamics? I need to research THAT.) I would totally make this again – it was a fun treat. I bet it would be delicious on the grill for an al fresco brekkie, actually. Maybe next time – it would be perfect in the summer, when the mornings are still cool and you don’t want a 500* oven on in the house. (And if you’ve never baked pizza on the grill, google that shit immediately.)
Alright – you ready?

The Crust
The night before, stir together in your Kitchenaid mixer bowl:
3.5 oz flour
3.5 oz water
¼ tsp. yeast
Cover with some wax paper or a tea towel and go to bed.

In the morning, add to the bowl:
9 oz flour
4 oz warm water
1 tsp. yeast
1 ¼ tsp. salt
Mix with the dough hook about five or so minutes. It will be sticky, but still pull away from the edges of the bowl.
Divide the dough in to four balls, rub them with some olive oil, cover them with some wax paper and leave in warm place for an hour. After half an hour, heat up your oven and choose your toppings.

The Toppings
4 Campari tomatoes in ¼” slices
8 quarter artichoke hearts
10 zucchini ribbons (run a veg peeler down the length of a washed zucchini)
Two to three 1/8″ slices sweet onion, separated in to rings
4 tsp. virgin olive oil
1 tsp. Italian herbs
¼ c. parmesan cheese
4 large eggs
Plus, get out your baking sheet and sprinkle it with enough corn meal to coat the bottom, about a ¼ cup. This is the non-stick surface for your ‘za.
When the hour was up for the dough, I put two balls in the fridge to make pizzas for dinner. For the other two, I rolled them out – thick crust 7” circle (or, in my case, amorphous blob shape), thin 10”.
Place the crust on the cornmeal surface. Drizzle with half the olive oil, the Italian herbs and half the parmesan. Arrange the veg – the only rule is to make sure they form a egg-proof perimeter around the edges. Crack on your eggs, sprinkle with the remaining cheese and drizzle with the remaining olive oil and carefully slide in to the oven. Halfway through (about 6 minutes), rotate your tray(s).
It’s done when the egg is how you like it. For medium, it was 12 minutes in our oven with eggs cold from the fridge.

Bon apétit. Serve as is, or with a drizzle of pesto. Ha! Although I forgot to take a pic with the pesto, so it’s imagine what it would look like time. Sigh. Anywho, make some and enjoy.

Sizzling Garlic Ginger Noodles


Yeah, so this all started because I stumbled across a recipe for Bang Bang noodles. (How do you NOT google something called Bang Bang after you see it? I mean, come on!)

So, they are these amazing-sounding home made noodles. I found this Youtube video with this cute kid making them at home, and the part where he is sizzling the ginger and garlic on top of the noodles just put me in to the obsessive-I-must-have-these kinda frame of mind. But, I am trying to stay away from the wheat flour. But, these noodles sound so damn good. Then I remembered, hey! I’ve got that bag of rice noodle ramens from Costco in the pantry! w00t!! Hey! I also have a bag of ho fun noodles in there! Game on, betches!

Are you ready for some amazing?

If you need supplies for this, btw, go to your local asian market – like Lee Lee. The prices on Amazon are nuckin’ futz. And, if you don’t want to grate your own ginger or press your garlic, the spendy tubes from the grocery store also work just great.

Sizzling Garlic Ginger Noodles for Two
The basic ingredients:
-Two blocks of ramen noodles, or half a 16oz package of ho fun (fat rice fettucine)
-2 Tbsp. grated fresh ginger
-2 tsp. minced or pressed garlic
-2-4 Tbsp. Korean red pepper flakes.
-¼ to ½ c. hot vegetable oil
-2 c. thinly sliced vegetables (broccoli, carrot, snap pea, celery, cabbage, whole bean sprouts, etc.), or four baby bok choy, quartered lengthwise
-Rice vinegar
-Soy sauce
Have everything chopped and ready before you start. Set out two big noodle bowls.
Boil the noodles according to the package directions. The last 30 seconds of cooking, toss in the veg and stir. If you’re doing the bok choy, do it a minute ahead. Then drain.
While the noodles are cooking, heat the vegetable oil until it is really hot – just before the smoking point.
Divide the cooked noodles/veg between the bowls, trying to keep the veg on the bottom and the noodles up top. Sprinkle the noodles with the red pepper, then put the ginger and the garlic (& the green onion, if you have those). Carefully ladle about 2-3 Tbsp. of the super hot oil on top of the ginger/garlic paste. It will sizzle and pop. (Turn off the burner for the oil – that’s done.)
Drizzle with some soy sauce and some vinegar, add any other condiments you like listed below. Stir and eat.


Suggested accoutrements:
-sesame seeds
-sliced green onion
-cilantro leaves
Chinese black vinegar
-sesame oil

This is really filling. And cheap. If you wanted to boost the protein, add some shredded chicken, or a poached egg, cubed or fried tofu, yatta yatta.

Guten apetit and noodle happiness to you.

Vanilla Strawberry Jam…..and orange scones

It’s almost spring, kind of a pre-spring really. I say this because Sprouts had quarts of strawbabies for 97 cents, and I was all over that. But…..although they were red, they were not really flavorful or sweet. So, what to do with a ton of non-optimal berries?

Then I remembered this awesome book I checked out from the library about small-batch canning, Food in Jars. I’d checked it out to read while planning a fig-onion-jam-making party, only it’s winter and the onions are all shite and not yet worthy of jam making. That mother is still totally happening, but once the onions are fat and sweet and not stringy and hot. But I digress. So, strawberry jam was now on the agenda. Last time I made it, I added some vanilla and it was awesome. So, there we go – I now had a plan.

I did this granny-style, 1:1 by weight fruit to sugar. Plus a 3″ piece of already scraped vanilla pod.

It is really yummy, but quite sweet. And a little heavy on the vanilla (I guess I was expecting a miracle and the cooking to make the berries have more berry-ness?). This is the kind of jam for crostatas, or afternoon tea, or sandwiched in a white layer cake. We had it with some orange scones (the usual recipe, with the zest of half an orange added, and just a little egg wash and sparkle sugar on top.)

This was a fun Friday morning off project, only took a couple of hours. If you’ve never canned before, I can highly recommend Marisa McClellan’s book, or The Spruce has a great visual beginner’s guide. It’s not hard, but there are some safety bits that are essential.

Ok – Here’s the recipe for Vanilla Strawberry Jammy Jams

Ingredients:
2 pounds fresh strawberries; washed, stemmed, cut in half
2 pounds sugar
3″ piece of vanilla bean pod that’s already had its seeds scraped out. (or a one-inch piece of whole pod)

In a big stock pot on a very low flame, mix the berries and sugar. Use a potato masher to smoosh it up. Toss in the vanilla bean pod. Check on it and stir it every ten minutes or so at the beginning to make sure the sugar isn’t burning. Once it’s liquidy, let it barely bubble away for about two hours, then start to stir it every 15 minutes or so, again to make sure the bottom doesn’t scorch. When it sheets on a spoon, it’s ready (What the hell does that mean? Read on, baby!) At that point you can can it in a water bath, or put it in to freezer jam jars. Or just refrigerator jars. With all that sugar, it’ll stay good for quite a long while. Take some to the neighbors – mine loved it!

I’ll post about those scones later; I tried a Nigella trick and tossed the dough in the freezer for 20 minutes before cutting the dough. THAT was amazeballs and I am definitely doing THAT again.

Ok, go make some jam. It’s easy.

Coconut Almond Tart

Coconut Almond Tart
GF and deelish, betches.

I was scrolling through some of my old Pinterest boards, and saw this French Coconut Pie recipe I’d saved a long time ago. My my, but it just looked so damn delish – crunchy sugary top with a buttery chewy coconut filling. It had a LOT of sugar, though, so I cut it by a third in this version. I’ve been wanting to try a tart with a gluten-free crust, too, since one of my favorite ladies at the office can’t have wheat (like, seriously, an illness not a fad diet thing), and I want her to be included in the goodies. I had some almond flour in the pantry, and found a decent recipe to riff over at Craftsy.

Ok, so this is insanely rich. When I made it I decided to use a 4”x13” tart pan instead of the 9” round, so I had about ¾ c. filling left over. Which of course I baked in silicone cupcake cups because *hello*, pie filling, and that meant we could taste it and still get pictures of a whole tart. Win/win! I gave himself a taste of the filling and he says, “Oh. Ok. Don’t make this again.” Now, in husband-speak that means if you make this I will want to eat the whole damn pie so please save me from myself. (Oh, I *do* love this man, is he not the best??) The thing that surprised me the most was how yellow the filling is; but, with three eggs and half a cup of butter it makes sense.

The crust if very fragile once baked (look at one corner that crumbled as I removed the tart from the pan.) I’ll be looking for a different one to try. But it’s tasty.

Crust:
2 c. almond flour
½ c. GF AP flour
¼ tsp. salt
½ c. butter

Filling:
3 eggs
1 c. sugar
¼ tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla
1 c. shredded coconut
1 Tbsp. white vinegar
½ c. butter

Preheat oven to 350*.
In the food processor, whir briefly to combine:
2 c. almond flour
½ c. GF AP flour
¼ tsp. salt
Add:
8 Tbsp. butter (a stick, cut up),
and pulse until it looks like soft cookie dough.
Smoosh this out and up the sides your tart pan until it is an even width and looks like a pie crust. It helps to oil your hands before you start; this stuff is sticky. (And – this could be a good job for house munchkins.)
Parbake it for 10 mins.

Meanwhile, make the filling.
Melt ½ c. unsalted butter, set aside.

In your mixer bowl (whisk attachment), beat on med-high until lemon-colored and fluffy (about a minute):
3 eggs
1 c. sugar
¼ tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla

Add to the mixer:
1 c. shredded coconut
1 Tbsp. white vinegar
and the melted butter.
Whip on med-high for another minute.

Take the par-baked shell out of the oven, pour in the filling and put it back in for about 50-60 minutes. When is it done? It will be puffy and golden and not jiggle when you jostle the pan. (Mine was done in 40 because it was smaller and narrower than the 9” round.)

This begs for a pineapple compote or a Kahlua ganache with some whipped cream and a macamademia praline sprinkle. But, ya know, I’m trying to simplify and whatnot.

Enjoy. I’m not going to calculate the nutritional value on this one – come one, you can tell it’s a fat-laden sugar bomb of indulgence. Just have a small piece and then walk an extra mile tomorrow.

Share if you try it!!!

Post Script on the crust – it firmed up a tidge over night. My favorite office lady told me to go 50/50 with the almond flour and GF flour, and add a tiny bit of binder – I have guar gum. So, I’ll try that next time. The office folks all enjoyed the tart, or at least said they did. Yeah!

Moroccan Chickpea Stew

Soup. Dammit but I love soup. You get so much for so very little…..

I organized a Stone Soup at the office back in early December, and my department-mates loved it so much, we’ve got an informal ‘Soup Wednesday’ going. One of the gals left her crockpot in the kitchen, and each week someone says, “hey, let’s do such and such this week” – and away we go! Wednesdays are an insane day in my profession, and typically we can’t even get a lunch hour – so this has become quite the awesome tradition. But I digress…..

I was a-Googlin’ for something different and interesting to make next week, and stumbled across the idea of a chickpea soup with Moroccan spices. So, I cobbled together what I liked about all the recipes and what I knew I had on-hand, and gave this a shot for a Friday dinner. Oh, is this good. So, so good. It was maybe 10 minutes of actual work, and about 40 to simmer. The house smelled incredible. And on a chilly night, the warmth of the soup with that gorgeous combination of smoked paprika, cumin and cinnamon? Pure heaven. Make this right now – you prolly have the ingredients in the pantry. I even used my cheap-o Trader Joe’s smoked paprika, not the good Spanish stuff. If you don’t have that, just use regular (sweet) paprika.

I drizzled mine with extra-virgin olive oil, Himself did a dollop of plain Greek yogurt and some cilantro. Some grilled Greek-style pita or a sliced baguette would go superbly with this.

Enjoy! I’m serious – go make this right now. I’m going to try it in the crockpot next Wednesday at the office – wish me luck!

Moroccan Chickpea Stew
Serves 2 seriously hungry people, or not-so-hungry plus leftovers

In your soup pot, saute:
2 Tbsp. olive oil
¼ white onion, diced
3-4 celery ribs, in soup-sized chunks
3-4 carrots, in soup-sized chunks
After a couple minutes, add in:
3 cloves garlic, chopped
2 Tbsp. pimenton ahumado
1 tsp. Cumin
1 tsp. cinnamon
¼ c. tomato paste
After a couple minutes, add in:
1 (14.5oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (14.5oz) can chickpeas, drained
2 quarts chicken (or vegetable) broth
Simmer for 30 minutes, then use a potato masher and smoosh one side of the pot and add:
1 c. frozen chopped spinach (no need to thaw before)
Simmer 10 more and soup is on, betches!

Serve with: Greek yogurt & Fresh coriander (cilantro), or XVOO, or a squeeze of fresh lemon.

Revision 1/28 – Oops! Forgot the nutritional info! According to the VeryWell.com calorie calculator, if you get 3 servings out of this, each serving has:
323 calories
12.7 g fat
693mg sodium
42.1g carbs (12.5g fiber!)
12.2g protein
and 30% of your iron and 23% potassium for the day

Caldo de Verduras con Chochoyotes

Hey, now. That was quite the hiaitus. I used up my December creative juices on a tamalada and 80 dozen cookies and was enjoying myself so much I forgot to take pictures. This was great for me, but sad for the blog.
So, happy new year! It’s a cold, grey, windy day for the first time in weeks. Which means soup at our house. Caldo de verduras con chochoyotes, to be precise. (Vegetable soup with corn flour dumplings.)

I can just hear you – cho-cho-what? Funny story, that one. Last fall I was making some veggie soup. I grew up with dumplings on stew, and I started to wonder if they had a similar tradition in Mexico – short answer, yes! And I discovered a really awesome blog in the process! (Go check it out!)
With a really fun-to-say name, this is a double win. How can you not smile when you say chochoyote. I mean, come on!
Ready to play?

Caldo de verduras con chochoyotes
serves: 4-6

For the soup:
2 Tbsp. olive oil
½ small white onion, large dice
3 carrots, peeled and in soup-sized discs
4 ribs celery, in soup-sized chunks
2 zucchini, in soup-sized chunks
3 garlic cloves, coarsly chopped
1 can low sodium diced tomatoes
4 quarts chicken (or vegetable) broth
1/4 packet menudo soup spices Or, about 2 Tbsp. (NOT the ground kind, the dried leafy kind.)
Briefly saute the chopped veg in the oil in a large soup pot. Then add in the tomatoes, broth and spices. Turn to medium-low. This is going to look sparse at first – like a LOT of broth and so few veg. The dumplings will absorb a lot of the liquid, and act as a thickener, too. It will be lovely, swearsies.

Make the masa for the dumplings.
Mix 1 c. masa harina with ½ tsp. salt and ¾ c. warm tap water. This will make a thick crumbly mess. Add 2 Tbsp fat (bacon fat, lard, or crisco – bacon is the best) and with clean hands, knead the dough until it is combined. It should be firm and not sticky, like a play-do consistency. Roll it in to 4 logs about a 1.5” in diameter and 5” long. Cover and set aside at room temp for 20-30 minutes.

Meanwhile, the soup should be at a bare simmer. After the wait, take one of the masa logs, break it in to 5 even pieces and roll each one in to a ball. With your thumb (or an implement, I used the end of my lemon reamer because fingernail marks in the dumplings sick me out.) But I digress. So, put a dimple in each dough ball so that it looks like a little bowl, and gently place each one in the pot. Gently shake the pot to get them to submerge if needed. Don’t stir – they’re super fragile and will just come apart. Repeat this process until all the dumplings are in the pool.

Keep at a bare simmer for 20-30 mins. The soup will thicken and the dumplings will cook. Check for doneness by taking one out and slicing it in half; it should be the same color all the way through. If there’s an uncooked core, just simmer them for five more minutes and check again.

Serve like any Mexican-style caldo – with lime wedges and hot pepper, some oregano or cilantro , maybe some sliced radish – so everyone can season their bowl to their taste.

If you actually have leftovers of this, they won’t last long. This little bowl of love is like a veggie stew with tamales in it. You are going to LOVE this. I promise.

updated 01.22.18 – add “room temp” to resting the masa.

Happy Thanksgiving 2017

We wish you a table bountiful in love and delightful in tastes.
See you in a week-ish.

P.S. You see a face in that pumpkin, right? Himself says no, but it is totally there you guys.

Snausages! (Spicy Turkey Breakfast Bites)

Oh, my goodness. The twelve year old inside me cannot stop giggling at calling something bites. (It’s a French thing, you’ll have to google it.) But! Saw this idea while scouring the Pinterest for low carb breakfast ideas other than eggs.

I’ll give this a good grade – it’s yummy. Ground turkey mixed with some grated butternut squash and onion for moisture and flavor, with some fresh rosemary, sage and red pepper flakes to add spice. I am actually looking forward to mornings this week for the first time in a while.

Spicy Turkey Breakfast Bites
(Can we call it sausage? I don’t know if we can….but that’s the idea.)

1 lb. 85% lean ground turkey
1/2 c. grated white onion
1/2 c. grated butternut squash (or zucchini)
1 Tbsp. AP flour
1.5 Tbps. dried sage (leaves, not powder)
1.5 Tbsp. minced fresh rosemary
1 tsp. crushed red pepper

Preheat your oven to 400″. Line a baking sheet with silver foil and spritz with baking spray.
In a medium bowl, mix together everything but the turkey, then add in the turkey and mix well. I use clean hands, but use a paddle attachment in your mixer if you need to. Make twelve meatballs out of the mix, about the size of a golf ball. This is really sticky, btw, so just be mentally prepared. Then, wet your hand or the bottom of a glass and smoosh the balls down so they’re about 1/2″ thick and look like slider patties. Bake 20 minutes, turn, bake 10-15 more minutes. If they didn’t get brown enough, broil for 2-3 minutes. (Don’t bake much longer because you don’t want dry little hockey pucks.)

And, are you asking yourself why there’s a tablespoon of flour in there? It’s a back-up sponge; the ground turkey, grated onion and squash have a LOT of water between them. A little dash of starch (like bread crumbs in your meatloaf) keeps the moisture in the meat instead of running out the sides. I think. Since, you know, this is theoretical as I am not a food scientist.

Cool, and serve for brekkie. We had ours with an oven frittata, although a three-pack of these would be a great breakfast on their own.

The next time I make these, I am adding chopped spinach. Just for the added color and nutrients.

servings: 12

According to the verywell.com recipe nutrition analyzer, each patty has:
Cal 89
Fat 5.8g
Sodium 24mg
Carbs 1.9
Protein 7g