Pecan Brown Sugar Scones

This is the second attempt at these babies. I’ve been trying to capture Himself’s favorite dessert, pecan pie. Although these are not quite there, they are quite tasty. Hopefully a future post is coming that can be called the pecan pie version. Not today, though. If I make one more batch of these this weekend, I am afraid Himself will have my head.

This version is just sweet enough, with a nice crunch from the nuts, and a little hint of salt in the special icing.

These are a little more fussy than my usual, but don’t be scared off. It’s not hard, there’s just a couple extra bits. But hey! That’s what makes these so special. And pretty enough to get rid of the leftovers to the neighbors!
Shall we?

Pecan Brown Sugar Scones.
yield: 16 mini or 8 large

Scones:
2 c. AP flour
1/2 c. dark brown sugar, plus a little extra for sprinkling
¼ c. toasted chopped pecans
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
½ c. ice cold butter
¾ c. buttermilk
1 tsp. vanilla
1 egg separated, with the whites lightly whisked until foamy.
8-16 pretty pecan halves.

Icing:
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbps. water
¼ tsp. salt
½ tsp. vanilla
1 c. powdered sugar.

Preheat the oven to 375*.

For the Dry, in a medium-sized bowl mix together:
2 c. AP flour
¼ c. dark brown sugar
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
Mix, then cut in with a pastry cutter:
½ c. ice cold butter
Set aside, and a small bowl mix the wet:
¾ c. buttermilk
1 tsp. vanilla
1 egg yolk.

Mix the wet in to the dry genty until it is shaggy-looking. Turn on to your board/counter, and gently flold and knead until the tough barely holds tegether. With your board knife, cut the dough in to four equal parts, and gently shape and flatten each in to a disc about 6” across and ½” high. On two of the discs, sprinkle:
¼ c. dark brown sugar
¼ toasted chopped pecans.
With your board knife, gently lift one of the plain discs and set it on top of the nuts/sugared disc. (Do the same for the other) Gently press down, they will kind of stick together. Smooth the outside edge so there’s no brown sugar poking out. (Otherwise, the top half will just slide off the bottom half during baking.) Use your board knife to slice each disc in to 8 wedges. (I do halves, quarters, then eighths). Place about ½” apart on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Toss the pecan halves in the foamy egg whites. Brush the backs and tops of the wedges with the beaten egg white, and place a pecan half on each. (Why not the sides? I don’t know the chemistry of it, but essentially it’ll seal the sides so there’s no where for the scone to rise and expand in the oven.) Sprinkle the moist tops with a little more brown sugar. Bake about 15 – 18 minutes until deep golden. Remove from the oven. and place the scones on a cooling rack. When they are just barely still warm, drizzle with the salted brown sugar icing. (And ermehgerd, this icing! I wanted to just eat it with a spoon. This would be amazeballs on a coffee cake. Soooo yummy.)
The Icing:
In a microwave-safe bowl (or 4 cup pyrex!), put:
2 Tbsp. dark brown sugar
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbps. water
Microwave until it is bubbling. (Mine took about 30 seconds). Stir in:
¼ tsp. salt
½ tsp. vanilla
1 c. powdered sugar.
Stir. It should be the consistency of a thick icing. Put it in a pastry tube to drizzle over the almost-cool scones. Serve and eat!


Remember to take some to the neighbors!

For the 16-scone version, the nutritional info per scone calculated using the verywell.com site is:
Calories 256
Fat 18.8g
Sodium 132mg
Carbs 19.6g (fiber 2.3g, sugars 5.7g)
Protein 4.3

Green Chili Corn Cakes

Creen Chili Corn Cakes

These are so tender, savory, spicy and sweet, with just a little tooth from the corn kernals. I highly recommend making these immediately for dinner or breakfast. We spread ours with butter and a little drizzle of agave syrup. Total yum. Himself considers them very tasty.

I made these a couple weeks back after I saw a Food52 Instagram post for these masa cakes with cheese and cilantro crema. They looked so very tasty; well, except for the cheese and crema parts in our lactose-impaired household. Modified a bit for our tastes, boy are these amazing. The recipe is brilliant with the addition of some corn starch to the flour – it makes these so very tender.

As always, this recipe needs Hatch green chili. Do not use the mushy tasteless canned things. If you don’t have Hatch, mince up fine a fat jalapeno without the ribs and seeds, but use about 30% less of that than the green chili. And, if you are lucky enough to be able to eat cheese, a sprinkle of cotija on this would be amazeballs.
I keep wanting to see how these would be as a bun for an eggie sammich on a weekday morning, but there are never any left by Monday morning….life’s tough, I know.

Alrighty then, let’s make these mofos:

Green Chili Corn Cakes
Time: 30 m
Yield: about a dozen 3” cakes
Heat your griddle to medium.

Dry – in a big bowl, stir together:
1 c. corn flour (masa harina like MaSeca, NOT corn meal)
3 Tbsp. corn starch
½ c. AP flour
2 tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt

Wet – in a second bowl, whisk:
2 eggs
1 ½ c. buttermilk
2 Tbsp. oil (mild like Canola or light olive)
4 Tbsp. sugar
1/3 c. grated onion.
½ c. thawed frozen corn kernals
½ c. chopped Hatch green chili

Mix the dry with the wet until combined. You don’t have to be super gentle like with wheat flour, the masa doesn’t have gluten to toughen things up. (Don’t go nuts – there is a little AP in there.) Cook the way you do pancakes. Then happily consume them.

Bon apétit!

The VeryWell.com recipe nutrition calculator says each cake has:
cal: 135
fat: 3.9g
sodium: 366mg
carb: 21.9g (fiber: 1.3g, sugar: 6.2g)
protein: 3.7
and! 75% of your Vitamin C for the day (who knew? must be the chilis?)

Cranberry Walnut Spice Scones

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Oh, it’s been a while my lovelies. I don’t think I’ve made scones in a year.
Mainly it’s Himself’s sugar restrictions, that plus reining myself in. But Fall is coming. Pumpkin spice lattes are saturating the atmosphere. Made some pumpkin bread last week for our respective offices, but then my contrary nature just refused to make a pumpkin scone.
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But, honestly, what is it about pumpkin pie, or pumpkin bread, or lattes – that orange bit itself is pretty tasteless. But the spice? Oh, yes. The spice. That’s where the magic is.
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These scones are light and just barely sweet. Perfect for slathering in butter and honey or orange marmelade. Makes 16 minis or 8 standard.
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Ingredients
1 ¾ c. AP flour
¼ c. sugar
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
½ c. cold butter, cubed
¾ c. buttermilk
1 egg, separated –white lightly whisked.
½ tsp. vanilla extract
Sparkle sugar (or granulated sugar)

Preheat oven to 425*.
1. Line a standard size cookie sheet with parchment paper.
2. In a large bowl, mix the dry. Cube the cold butter and drop it in the dry mix. Cut it in until it is after pea-sized but not yet coarse crumb.
3. Stir in the nuts and cranberries.
4. Whisk together the egg yolk, vanilla and buttermilk.
5. Flour your counter, barely stir the liquid in to the dry, then put it on your floured counter to barely, gently work the dough to a cohesive ball. With plenty of flour on your hands, gently, gently flatten the ball in to a disc about 8″ across and 1″ high. (or, divide the ball in two and flatten both those in to discs about 1″ high). Heavily flouring your board knife or a large chef’s knife, cut the circle in to 8 triangles. (Or you can make two 6” discs for 16 minis.)
**A Karen lazy step here is, I actually put my parchment on the counter and use it to help form the dough, then cut the scones directly on it, and slide it on to the cookie sheet.
6. Brush the tops and backs (not the sides) with the egg white, sprinkle with sparkle sugar.
7. Bake 425* 15-18 mins until golden brown.
8. Cool slightly, slather in butter and munch.
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Focaccia (Using a Poolish)

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I used to just love that Tyler Florence focaccia recipe – it was easy and fast. But the last time I made it, I realized it was just…..white bread. Focaccia is chewy, and pillowy, and crisp from the olive oil, with big air holes.

I started to wonder if that poolish thing that works for baquettes would work for focaccia, and the interwebs said yes!!
focaccia1How the poolish looks the next morning.

Our Google overlords took me back to the absolute number one bread blog in the world (and one I thought had been taken down), Artisan Bread Baking. This recipe is a mix of that, and what I remember from a Cook’s Illustrated recipe from long ago.

I wanted to give some to the neighbors, and remembered the CI one used cake pans – so there we go.
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This turned out fairly well. Light. Beautiful olive oil crust. The only thing I’d do differently next time is split the dough between four pans – in three, it was just a smidge too thick for our tastes.
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I hope you try this – this is a very kid-friendly recipe. You get to smoosh the dough out in the pan using your hands, place toppings on it, and poke it with your fingers before baking. Tactile play that is deliciously edible! Good times!!
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Make this next weekend. For reals – you’re home on a Saturday morning anyway, right? Give it a try.

Focaccia

The night before, make the poolish and some rosemary water:
9oz water
9oz AP flour
2 tsp yeast
Stir it up (it will be a thick sticky batter). Cover it with wax paper or saran and leave it on the counter overnight.
Boil 6 oz water. Put it in a heat-safe cup or bowl, drop in a 3″ sprig or rosemary or a tablespoon of dried, cover it with saran and leave it on the counter next to the poolish overnight.

The next morning, in your KitchenAide bowl or a big mixing bowl, add:
14 oz AP or bread flour
6 oz rosemary water
6 oz extra virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp dried Italian Herb mix
and the poolish.
Mix it up (with a dough hook or a wooden spoon) til it comes together, cover and let it rest 20 minutes.
Add the salt, knead it for six minutes. This dough is sticky. Cover and rest 30 minutes.
*Gently* fold the dough(Good Dave Johnson vid after the jump). Cover and rest 30 minutes.
Again, *gently* fold the dough. Cover and rest 30 minutes.
Finally, *gently* fold the dough. Cover and rest 20 minutes.

Line a sheet pan (or 3-4 8″ round cake pans) with parchment, generously grease the bottom and sides with olive oil. (For the smaller pans, cut the dough into thirds or fourths with your bench scraper.) Put the dough in the pan, and *gently* push it out to the edges of the pan using your fingers. Place your toppings (onion, olive, tomato – anything thick and moist – the light herby-type stuff comes later). Drizzle with olive oil. Loosely top with waxed paper and a tea towel and let it rise for at least an hour.

Heat the oven to 500*. If you have a baking stone, get that mofo in there. While it is pre-heating, poke the risen dough with your finger to make those focaccia indentations. Drizzle with more olive oil, and sprinkle with the herbs of your choice. (I like fresh rosemary.) Let this sit for 15 minutes, then pop in the hot oven. Reduce the temp to 450* and bake about 25 minutes or so until golden. Interior temp s/b at least 200*. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with some flaked kosher salt and coarse black pepper.

Cool, and eat. This makes amazing sammiches with some pesto. If you don’t eat it the same day, warm it a little in the oven to bring the crust back before serving.

Ciambella

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So, we were fast approaching the day when all are Irish. I made soda bread for the first time last year, and it was not anything like I’d expected. It was like a giant scone that you slice. So, since I have that other blog deal now, I did the Irish for that. But that made me think about ciambella – an Italian breakfast cake. Lemony, not too sweet. A little dry so you can schmear it with yummy jam or dip it in your cappucino. It’s like Italian soda bread, really.
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What do I love most about this? The rich buttery taste? The crunchy pearl sugar? The soft, lemony insides? I can never decide. But a hunk of this with some strawberry jam, and I am one happy, crumb-covered monster. This would be amazing with some whipped cream, too. I keep wanting to try it with orange. Or grapefruit. But hey – it’s citrus season. Maybe I’ll do that one next time.

This is an adaptation of a recipe from Mario Batali, and the freaking genius uses a food processer.
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I know I’ve been away. I took hiaitus through mid-February. When I tried to come back, I discovered the dark, seedy underbelly of having a blog. My site had been corrupted by some dickweed embedding some malicious code. Hacked through a vulnerability in my theme, and possibly through the recipe plug-in I’d been using. The Yum was flagged. I couldn’t even get in – we tried many different ways over a couple of weeks, but in the end the bastard had us beat. We had to pay our hosting site a fee (that we call a ransom) to remove it. I’m still pissed – feeling that violated, and unable to do anything was beyond maddening. Sooo….yeah. That’s where I’ve been. It’s still not right – look at this ugly theme, for now. But I want to be up and running again, and will tweak the pretties over a little time. In the meanwhile, please enjoy some ciambella.
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Brilliant!
Buon appetito!

2 c. AP flour
½ c. sugar
½ tsp. baking powder
8 Tbsp (1 stick) butter
1 egg
¼ tsp. almond extract
1 tsp. vanilla extract
zest of one lemon
¼ c. buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 Tbsp. pearl sugar & 1 tbsp. milk or water
Preheat oven to 375. Grease a shallow tube pan (like a baba au rhum pan), or line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.
Put the dry ingredients in the food process, pulse to combine.
Add the butter cubes, pulse until it looks like polenta.
Mix everything but the pearl sugar, pour it in the food processor, and pulse until you have dough.
It will be very stiff – like cookie dough. Pull it out, and roll it into a log about 2” thick. You can circle it in to the tube pan, or you can make it look like a giant doughnut on the parchment. You could also shape it in to a loaf about 3” wide and 8” long.
Once it’s shaped, brush it with the milk or water and sprinkle it with the pearl sugar.
Bake about 30-35 mins until golden and a tester comes out clean.
Cool and eat!
SERVINGS – 10
NIciambella

Ginger Raisin Spice Bread

So I want to call this pumpkin ginger raisin spice bread, but just can’t. I’m still trying to use up the 8 cups of cooked pumpkin I batch froze back in September with that ill-fated grocery store pumpkin buy. I just cannot bring myself to just throw it out. It is not very orange and does not taste very pumpkin-like. 

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I learned my lesson, and have four sugar pumpkins from Willcox waiting to be cooked and bagged. But I know myself, if I cook those now that poor grocery pumpkin will have died for naught, collecting freezer burn in his zippy back way in the back. But I digress.  I cannot make pie with this shit, so I decided on a pumpkin bread. Only with lots of flavor additions like candied ginger, raisins and spices.  

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When I buy the candied ginger, I actually have to hide it from Himself. It’s like crack. Or maybe cryptonite, that and australian black licorice.  Ok! On to the bread – this is another of those one-bowl wonders, and is really quick. 

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See what I’m saying? Hell, the piece of candied ginger looks more orange than this bread. Stupid pumpkin.

 

I hope you try this, and use good pumpkin! This would be equally tasty with an equivalent amount of grated fresh zucchini in place of the pumpkin. 

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I love this glaze, too. It’s the usual orange zest/juice with icing sugar and the loverly addition of some more of that pumpkin pie spice. This is a scrumptious fall treat – I hope you try it!
Ingredients
For the batter
2 c sugar
2 c pumpkin puree
2/3 c veg oil
4 eggs
2 tsp vanilla
3 c AP flour
4 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
½ c raisins
¼ c minced candied ginger
for the topping
zest & juice of half an orange
2 Tbsp water
1.5-2 c. powdered sugar
½ tsp pumpkin pie spice
¼ c. minced candied ginger to garnish

Instructions
Spray the bottom of each loaf pan and line it with parchment. Preheat oven to 350*.
Throw everything but the ginger/raisins In the mixer bowl with the paddle, give it a whirl on medium until it’s all mixed. Add the ginger/raisins and give a quick spin to mix them in.
Divide the batter between the pans.
Bake 50-60m. until a tester comes out clean. Cool to just warm, then remove from the pans.
While they are cooling, mix together the glaze. It should be the consistency of thin pancake batter. When they are just warm to your palm, pour half the glaze of the tops of the loaves and use a pastry brush to spread it all over, including the sides. Next, drizzle the remaining glaze and sprinkle the tops with the garnish candied ginger.
Cool completely before slicing.
By Karen Maginnis
Adapted from Betty Crocker’s Best of Baking (MacMillan, 1997)
serves 16
calories 364
fat 11g
cholesterol 47mg
sodium 23mg
carbs 64g
-fiber 2g
-sugars 42g
protein 5g

Buttermilk Onion Rye & Apple Chutney

Fall apple day trips. Always these problems start with that autumnal urge to harvest. Then you wind up with twelve pounds of apples on the kitchen table, wondering what the hell to do with them all.  A quick poll from friends and got a great suggestion from K. for apple chutney. Mmmm. Sounded yummy.

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Then Karen happened, because what to put the chutney on? Oh, that onion rye bread would be delicious with a sweet and spicy topping. And maybe some cheese. And, poof! There went my Saturday!

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Three loaves for the neighbors!

 

Originally, I was going to post about the chutney. But I wasn’t super excited with the results. Honestly, it just had way too damn many raisins in it. And I wanted a stronger ginger and hot pepper taste. So, another day. My friend K. has excellent taste, so I know I just need a different recipe.    But this bread?! I love this bread. It is SO easy to make for a yeast bread,  and truly yummy.

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Make a sammich (with that chutney!), serve it in wedges with soup, put it on a cheese board. Yummy, moist, subtley oniony with that distinctive rye taste. Give this bad boy a whirl, you’ll be happy.

 

Ingredients
1 ½ c dark rye flour
2 ½ – 3c. AP flour
2 Tbsp sugar
2 tsp table salt
1 Tbsp yeast
1 c. buttermilk
1/3 c. warm water
2 Tbsp olive oil
¾ c. grated onion with juice (that’s about 1 medium white or yellow)
Instructions
Grate the onion in the food processor, if possible.
Put all the liquid ingredients in the bottom of the mixer with the dough hook attachment. Then all the dry.
Start on low, then once homogenous put to medium and knead for five minutes. The dough will be super springy and pretty sticky. It should hold its shape.
Grease a large bowl and the ball of dough, cover and let rise 1.5 hours. (Hint! Before putting the dough in the bowl, lightly oily your hands, too. Trust me on this – you’ll be glad.)
After the first proof, heavily dust your board with flour.
Line a baking sheet with parchment.
Get the proofed dough out of the bowl and onto the board. (Some will probably stick to the bowl.) Keeping everything covered with just enough flour not to stick to you or board, shape one oval or two boules. Get good surface tension, and place the loaves on the parchment.
Lightly dust with more flour. Cover and let rise another hour or so, til double.
Heat the oven to 375*.
Right before baking, score the loaves (and X, a square, parallel lines – whatever floats your boat.), and bake about 40m until dark brown and hollow when thumped (or 190* interior).
Remove from the oven, cool.
Notes
The loaf will be somewhat flattish (because the dough was so soft), but makes excellent sammiches and goes great with a hearty soup. Or with some cheese and chutney!
I love this recipe. The dough is sticky, but thankfully I have the KitchenAid, so I only have to deal with it putting in a bowl for the first rise, and shaping the loaf. Try this, for a yeast bread it’s super low-maintenance.
Adapted from Bob’s Red Mill Organic Dark Rye flour package recipe
serves 6
calories 425
fat 7
cholesterol 3mg
sodium 833mg
carbs 79g
-fiber 10g
-sugars 8g
protein 14g

Herbed Biscotti. With an H.

Holy herbacious goodness, Batman!

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Rosemary, thyme, parsley, pignolias, shallot,  and lemon zest make these scrumptious. Good Lord, I just wrote “scrumptious”.

 

Still hunting for redemption after the Taralli failure, and started wondering about making a savoury biscotto. Did it exist?

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Google says yes! At least, yes one time thanks to La Bella Giada and all who have copied her, which would now mean me as well.

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Hey – there’s that darned spicy cherry tomato jam again! Forgive me. It is its swan song –  I am down to my last two jars. As yet this season I’ve not found more toms cheap enough to justify making them in to jam.  

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These lovely crunchy-but-not-too-hard biscuits are complemented beautifully by the spicy sweetness of the jam and the salty creaminess of the Manchega añejo. 
Ingredients
2 c. all-purpose flour
1/2 c. butter
1/4 c. goat cheese
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
3/4 tsp salt
1.5 Tbs minced fresh rosemary
1.5 Tbs minced fresh thyme
1 tsp lemon zest
1 tsp minced shallot
2 Tbs sugar
2 eggs, beaten
½ c. raw pignon nuts
Instructions
Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment.
Put everything but the eggs and the pignolias in the mixer bowl (paddle attachment) and mix until it is a fine and crumbly.
Add the eggs, mix just till cohesive.. Then do the same for the nuts.
Split the dough in half. It should be just this side of barely holding together.
Barely dust your work surface with some flour.
Take each half of the dough and gently roll it in to a log about 12” long and 2” in diameter. Repeat w/ second log.
Put them both on the lined baking tray.
Flatten the logs ever so slightly, so the are more ovoid than round.
With a lame or a sharp knife, very lightly score the down the middle down the whole length of the logs. This dough splits a little when baking, the scoring helps you control where it splits.
Bake 30 min at the 350*.
Remove from oven and cool.
Using a sharp serrated knife, cut the logs in to ½” thick slices, and place them flat on the parchment.
Bake again about 15-20 mins until they are just barely golden and nice and crunchy
Notes
Store in an airtight container in the fridge for weeks. (Ha! Right! Like they’ll last that long.)
Serve with soup, on a cheese board, with antipasto, or just plain.

serves 36
calories 68
fat 4mg
cholesterol 17mg
sodium 57mg
carbs 7g
-fiber 0g
-sugars 1g
protein 2g

Asiago Thyme Bread with Garlic Confit

Thought I’d give that four hour baguette recipe another try. Then Karen happened.

 

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I decided to take a break from the poolish recipe this week. And this morning when I opened the fridge, I saw this garlic confit I’d made to go with a roasted eggplant salad. Mmmmm…..that would be really good in a loaf of brea….wait! That’s it. And some herbs (with an H, people!). Thyme! Yes! Then shit got totally out of control with some shredded asiago cheese.  

The cheese baking smell was a bit strong for our typically dairy-free household. But they sho are purdee. 

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I’m thinking this would be scrumptious on a cheese and salami board, with some spicy cherry tomato jam. But, honestly, it’s meatballs tonight, so…… yeah. 

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Because of the added olive oil, this has a softer crust than the original baguette recipe – it’s almost like a focaccia-baguette baby.  Very tasty, though.  And man, there is just NOTHING like fresh bread.  Alright – I’m off to take a loaf to the neighbors. 

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Ingredients
3.5 c AP flour
1.5 tsp yeast
1.5 c. warm water
3 tsp. kosher flake salt.
3/4 c. grated asiago
2 tsp. dried thyme leaves
4-6 cloves of garlic cloves confit**, coarsely chopped and
¼ c. of the olive oil from the confit
Instructions
Mix in flour, yeast, water in the KitchenAide with dough hook. Cover with saran and leave for ½ hr.
Sprinkle with 3 tsp. kosher flake salt.
Knead in KitchenAide for four minutes.
Sprinkle with ¼ c grated asiago, thyme leaves, garlic cloves and ¼ c. of the olive oil from the confit
Knead one more minute.
Cover with saran, proof 45 m.
Punch down, fold. Proof 1 hr.
Shape in to 3 ficelles, put in real or parchment couche, cover and proof 1hr.
Last 15m of the hour, preheat the oven to 475*.
One top shelf, put shallow baking dish with about ½” water.
Uncover the loaves, spritz with a little water then sprinkle with the remaining ½ c. shredded asiago, slice the tops baguette-style and bake for 20 m.
Turn off oven, leave in 5m before removing.
Notes
**What’s garlic confit? Try this: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/garlic-confit
By Karen Maginnis
Adapted from Dan Leader’s 4-Hour Baguette in Saveur

yields 3 loaves
calories 814
fat 27g
cholesterol 22mg
sodium 2750mg
carbs 115g
-fiber 5g
-sugars 1g
protein 26g

Grissini e Taralli: A Tale of Failure

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The recipes for this post were quite the roller coaster. Failure is good. Builds character. Keeps you humble. Makes you learn.

Saw a lovely post on Pinterest about this little Italian cracker from Puglia that is served with wine, the taralli. Sort of like a pretzel, but round, and with fennel seeds inside.  That was my cooking project for the week.  I was seeing a beautiful antipasto platter, some friends over for wine. Yeah. It was gonna be awesome.  Did the usual, researched a bunch of recipes, compared the techniques and ingredients ratios, yatta yatta.  Made a special trip to get some cheap white wine (an essential ingredient), and we were ready to rock and roll.  Saturday morning came, and I was happily makin’ my taralli dough. Rolling out the little snakes, looping ‘em.  It was like play time with play dough. Boiled ‘em. Baked em. … Burned ‘em.  Oy. And those little fuckers were like rocks, even the not-so-burned ones.

 baking fail

I go back to my research. Decide to search for a YouTube tutorial. See what I did wrong  (they needed to be much, much fatter. And not burned.) Start over. Boil ‘em. Bake ‘em. Hmm…..they sure look pretty.
Rocks. Every one. Now of course himself comes home and pronounces them delicious, and says that I can’t enjoy them because of my chicklet teeth. (It’s how we show our love, people.) But I’m annoyed – the video lady could break one in one hand, and it takes me effort to snap my little rocks in two with both hands.  Alas….gorran crackers.

Those little discs look so innocent, don't they?
Those little discs look so innocent, don’t they?

 

On the top of the roller coaster of a cooking morning, however, is a great little grissini recipe that actually worked. And was fun, again in a playdough-snakes kind of way.  I went so easy on the rosemary, however, you can barely taste it. And, I didn’t like the slight sweetness. So, next time, more rosemary, less sugar, and add garlic.  Or maybe do smoked Spanish paprika and garlic and thyme.

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I’m still heartily annoyed to be bested by a fucking cracker. But the thrill is gone, and I don’t know if I want to invest more time to see if I can get some lovely light crunchy wine crackers.

It was good plan, at any rate.  Here’s the grissini link again – give it a try!  They would make an awesome project with kids for a spaghetti dinner.