Rosemary & Thyme Crackers


After making the onion fig jam, it really seemed a shame to eat it with store bought crackers. I looked at my last recipe, but decided to see if the Google had anything new. Found a good one to test from A Sweet Pea Chef; here’s the adaptation.

Of course, I decided to add the fresh thyme after I’d already taken the knoll shots – so let’s just pretend he’s there, maybe hiding under the rosemary trimmed from my plot by the back door.


(Look! It’s a map of Australia – which makes my brain immediately go to Amanda Palmer If you don’t know who she is, this is NSFW.)

This was super easy – mix in the Cuisinart, rest, roll, bake. She has the brilliant idea to rest the dough, since that gluten gets all excited in the mixing stage. The wait will make an easier roll and a non-tough cracker. Just sayin’, don’t rush it.

The first batch I made, I did the 50AP/50WW ratio she suggests, but it was too much whole wheat for our tastes. And it desperately needed salt, even with the sprinkle on top. So this version has a a higher ratio of AP flour, and we think it’s great.

Hope you enjoy.

Rosemary Thyme Crackers

1.5 c. ap flour
0.5 c. ww flour
1 tsp. fresh rosemary, minced
1 tsp. fresh thyme, minced
1 tsp. salt
4 Tbsp olive oil (organic, extra virgin if you want to get picky)
2/3 c. water
flake salt or fleur de sel for sprinkling

Mix the dry in the food processor. Add the oil, mix til evenly distributed. Add the water, mix until a stiff dough forms.

Rest it for 30 mins. (To get the gluten to relax so that: a. you can roll it out, and b. you don’t make little rocks.) Preheat the oven to 450*.

Get out two sheets of parchment the size of your cookie sheets. Split the dough evenly, and roll each superthin, like 1/8″, directly on the sheets of parchment you will bake on. Do not flour, the olive oil will keep it from sticking.
Use a pizza or ravioli cutter to make strips about 1.2″ wide.
Take a fork, and pierce the dough all over. This will prevent big bubbles from forming.
Lastly, sprinkle with a nice flake salt/fleur de sel and gently press it in to the dough so it will stick.
Bake about 15 minutes, until they are golden and dry, crispy, and cracker like.
Break the strips in to crackery pieces and enjoy.

Grissini e Taralli: A Tale of Failure

GrissiniPlateCmed

The recipes for this post were quite the roller coaster. Failure is good. Builds character. Keeps you humble. Makes you learn.

Saw a lovely post on Pinterest about this little Italian cracker from Puglia that is served with wine, the taralli. Sort of like a pretzel, but round, and with fennel seeds inside.  That was my cooking project for the week.  I was seeing a beautiful antipasto platter, some friends over for wine. Yeah. It was gonna be awesome.  Did the usual, researched a bunch of recipes, compared the techniques and ingredients ratios, yatta yatta.  Made a special trip to get some cheap white wine (an essential ingredient), and we were ready to rock and roll.  Saturday morning came, and I was happily makin’ my taralli dough. Rolling out the little snakes, looping ‘em.  It was like play time with play dough. Boiled ‘em. Baked em. … Burned ‘em.  Oy. And those little fuckers were like rocks, even the not-so-burned ones.

 baking fail

I go back to my research. Decide to search for a YouTube tutorial. See what I did wrong  (they needed to be much, much fatter. And not burned.) Start over. Boil ‘em. Bake ‘em. Hmm…..they sure look pretty.
Rocks. Every one. Now of course himself comes home and pronounces them delicious, and says that I can’t enjoy them because of my chicklet teeth. (It’s how we show our love, people.) But I’m annoyed – the video lady could break one in one hand, and it takes me effort to snap my little rocks in two with both hands.  Alas….gorran crackers.

Those little discs look so innocent, don't they?
Those little discs look so innocent, don’t they?

 

On the top of the roller coaster of a cooking morning, however, is a great little grissini recipe that actually worked. And was fun, again in a playdough-snakes kind of way.  I went so easy on the rosemary, however, you can barely taste it. And, I didn’t like the slight sweetness. So, next time, more rosemary, less sugar, and add garlic.  Or maybe do smoked Spanish paprika and garlic and thyme.

Grissini1Cmed

I’m still heartily annoyed to be bested by a fucking cracker. But the thrill is gone, and I don’t know if I want to invest more time to see if I can get some lovely light crunchy wine crackers.

It was good plan, at any rate.  Here’s the grissini link again – give it a try!  They would make an awesome project with kids for a spaghetti dinner.