Coconut Almond Tart

Coconut Almond Tart
GF and deelish, betches.

I was scrolling through some of my old Pinterest boards, and saw this French Coconut Pie recipe I’d saved a long time ago. My my, but it just looked so damn delish – crunchy sugary top with a buttery chewy coconut filling. It had a LOT of sugar, though, so I cut it by a third in this version. I’ve been wanting to try a tart with a gluten-free crust, too, since one of my favorite ladies at the office can’t have wheat (like, seriously, an illness not a fad diet thing), and I want her to be included in the goodies. I had some almond flour in the pantry, and found a decent recipe to riff over at Craftsy.

Ok, so this is insanely rich. When I made it I decided to use a 4”x13” tart pan instead of the 9” round, so I had about ¾ c. filling left over. Which of course I baked in silicone cupcake cups because *hello*, pie filling, and that meant we could taste it and still get pictures of a whole tart. Win/win! I gave himself a taste of the filling and he says, “Oh. Ok. Don’t make this again.” Now, in husband-speak that means if you make this I will want to eat the whole damn pie so please save me from myself. (Oh, I *do* love this man, is he not the best??) The thing that surprised me the most was how yellow the filling is; but, with three eggs and half a cup of butter it makes sense.

The crust if very fragile once baked (look at one corner that crumbled as I removed the tart from the pan.) I’ll be looking for a different one to try. But it’s tasty.

2 c. almond flour
½ c. GF AP flour
¼ tsp. salt
½ c. butter

3 eggs
1 c. sugar
¼ tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla
1 c. shredded coconut
1 Tbsp. white vinegar
½ c. butter

Preheat oven to 350*.
In the food processor, whir briefly to combine:
2 c. almond flour
½ c. GF AP flour
¼ tsp. salt
8 Tbsp. butter (a stick, cut up),
and pulse until it looks like soft cookie dough.
Smoosh this out and up the sides your tart pan until it is an even width and looks like a pie crust. It helps to oil your hands before you start; this stuff is sticky. (And – this could be a good job for house munchkins.)
Parbake it for 10 mins.

Meanwhile, make the filling.
Melt ½ c. unsalted butter, set aside.

In your mixer bowl (whisk attachment), beat on med-high until lemon-colored and fluffy (about a minute):
3 eggs
1 c. sugar
¼ tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla

Add to the mixer:
1 c. shredded coconut
1 Tbsp. white vinegar
and the melted butter.
Whip on med-high for another minute.

Take the par-baked shell out of the oven, pour in the filling and put it back in for about 50-60 minutes. When is it done? It will be puffy and golden and not jiggle when you jostle the pan. (Mine was done in 40 because it was smaller and narrower than the 9” round.)

This begs for a pineapple compote or a Kahlua ganache with some whipped cream and a macamademia praline sprinkle. But, ya know, I’m trying to simplify and whatnot.

Enjoy. I’m not going to calculate the nutritional value on this one – come one, you can tell it’s a fat-laden sugar bomb of indulgence. Just have a small piece and then walk an extra mile tomorrow.

Share if you try it!!!

Post Script on the crust – it firmed up a tidge over night. My favorite office lady told me to go 50/50 with the almond flour and GF flour, and add a tiny bit of binder – I have guar gum. So, I’ll try that next time. The office folks all enjoyed the tart, or at least said they did. Yeah!

Caldo de Verduras con Chochoyotes

Hey, now. That was quite the hiaitus. I used up my December creative juices on a tamalada and 80 dozen cookies and was enjoying myself so much I forgot to take pictures. This was great for me, but sad for the blog.
So, happy new year! It’s a cold, grey, windy day for the first time in weeks. Which means soup at our house. Caldo de verduras con chochoyotes, to be precise. (Vegetable soup with corn flour dumplings.)

I can just hear you – cho-cho-what? Funny story, that one. Last fall I was making some veggie soup. I grew up with dumplings on stew, and I started to wonder if they had a similar tradition in Mexico – short answer, yes! And I discovered a really awesome blog in the process! (Go check it out!)
With a really fun-to-say name, this is a double win. How can you not smile when you say chochoyote. I mean, come on!
Ready to play?

Caldo de verduras con chochoyotes
serves: 4-6

For the soup:
2 Tbsp. olive oil
½ small white onion, large dice
3 carrots, peeled and in soup-sized discs
4 ribs celery, in soup-sized chunks
2 zucchini, in soup-sized chunks
3 garlic cloves, coarsly chopped
1 can low sodium diced tomatoes
4 quarts chicken (or vegetable) broth
1/4 packet menudo soup spices Or, about 2 Tbsp. (NOT the ground kind, the dried leafy kind.)
Briefly saute the chopped veg in the oil in a large soup pot. Then add in the tomatoes, broth and spices. Turn to medium-low. This is going to look sparse at first – like a LOT of broth and so few veg. The dumplings will absorb a lot of the liquid, and act as a thickener, too. It will be lovely, swearsies.

Make the masa for the dumplings.
Mix 1 c. masa harina with ½ tsp. salt and ¾ c. warm tap water. This will make a thick crumbly mess. Add 2 Tbsp fat (bacon fat, lard, or crisco – bacon is the best) and with clean hands, knead the dough until it is combined. It should be firm and not sticky, like a play-do consistency. Roll it in to 4 logs about a 1.5” in diameter and 5” long. Cover and set aside at room temp for 20-30 minutes.

Meanwhile, the soup should be at a bare simmer. After the wait, take one of the masa logs, break it in to 5 even pieces and roll each one in to a ball. With your thumb (or an implement, I used the end of my lemon reamer because fingernail marks in the dumplings sick me out.) But I digress. So, put a dimple in each dough ball so that it looks like a little bowl, and gently place each one in the pot. Gently shake the pot to get them to submerge if needed. Don’t stir – they’re super fragile and will just come apart. Repeat this process until all the dumplings are in the pool.

Keep at a bare simmer for 20-30 mins. The soup will thicken and the dumplings will cook. Check for doneness by taking one out and slicing it in half; it should be the same color all the way through. If there’s an uncooked core, just simmer them for five more minutes and check again.

Serve like any Mexican-style caldo – with lime wedges and hot pepper, some oregano or cilantro , maybe some sliced radish – so everyone can season their bowl to their taste.

If you actually have leftovers of this, they won’t last long. This little bowl of love is like a veggie stew with tamales in it. You are going to LOVE this. I promise.

updated 01.22.18 – add “room temp” to resting the masa.

Corn Green Chile Sablés

Out provisioning on the weekend, I saw some P.A.N. flour – I’ve never cooked with it, but my friend L. has talked about using it for arepas. When I looked at the sandy texture of it, I immediately thought of sables. And you know how in those biscotti with the black pepper, or with pfefferneuse, or even a really strong ginger cookie there is that little surprise of heat that is just lovely with the sweet cookie crunch? I wondered how that corn flour would taste with a little pop of hot green chili. I wanted it with orange zest, but there was lime in the fridge…..
These came together easily – the dough is crumbly but sticks together with a little squeeze. At slicing time (three hours later – might improve overnight?), they were still crumbly but smooshed back together. Baked like a dream.
Had himself taste them, after rolling his eyes at seeing the chile. “That’s weird. But good. But weird.” as he reached for a second and then a third cookie.
This was a trial for the annual Christmas cookie run – not sure they’ll make the cut for that, but I do think I’ll make these again. They are much, much lighter than I thought they’d be, and that spicy-sweet action keeps us both reaching for the cookie plate.
If you make them, post how it goes!!
Corn Green Chile Sablés
Yield: 2 ½ dozen spicy-sweet goodies
In your mixer, combine:
2/3 c. sugar
2 c. P.A.N. white corn flour
¼ tsp. salt
zest of half a lime
Cube ¾ c. cold unsalted butter, and mix it in until the mixture ressembles fine moist crumbs.
Add ½ tsp. vanilla extract
2 egg yolks
Beat until combined.
Stir in 1/3 c. chopped roasted hot green chile.

Roll up like a log 2” in diameter, and refrigerate the dough a couple hours or overnight.
Preheat the oven to 375*, and line cookie sheets with parchment. Slice in to ½” rounds (you may need to smoosh them back in to shape), sprinkle with some (sparkle) sugar, smoosh it gently in to the top of the cookie with your palm or a the bottom of a glass.
Bake 10-13 minutes, until set and just barely golden around the edges.

Cold Steak and Ramen Salad

This all started when I saw gluten-free ramen at Costco. You know, that den of the budget-killing impulse buy. It’s freakin’ hot, but I thought they might make a nice cold salad – you know how you have cold soba noodles? Then of course I Google to see if this an original idea, and nope. It’s called Hiyashi Chuka, but looks like there has to be corn and slivered egg to be called that. Or, I could be wrong. But man there are some tasty-sounding options out there!
This is really best with these noodles just cooled to room temp (since they’re rice-based. You know how rice noodles get hard when they’re ice cold), and all the other ingredients icy cold.
Cook, rinse and cool the noodles according to package directions.
While that is happening, slice up:
green onion
leftover steak (or shrimp, or tofu)
In a small dish, mix together:
1T soy sauce or tamari
1 T rice vinegar
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp grated ginger
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
Serve hot chili oil on the side
Mix it.
Eat it.
The end.

Share if you try it!